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Saturday, February 22, 2014

To End the 9 to 5 Grind Optimism Is Necessary

Research confirms what feels intuitive; entrepreneurs are an optimistic group, afflicted with the 'optimism bias,' a tendency to view the glass as half full backed by the belief that negative events are what happens to those other people.

This is particularly true, one study found, of serial entrepreneurs, those bootstrapping men and women who we celebrate for persevering in the face of multiple failures. The more times you step up to bat, of course, the greater the likelihood that you'll hit a home run. But most of us aren't wired that way. We strike out, so we decide that maybe baseball isn't for us after all. It's a reasonable, rational response: we learn from our dismal performance, and are no longer as optimistic about our baseball abilities.

To end the 9 to 5 grind you can't react this way.
Failure should appear to leave you as optimistic as ever. 



Optimistic thinking can make you a better problem solver.

Negative emotions diminish the brain's capacity to think broadly and find creative solutions. The vise grip of fear and stress and the emotions they generate--anger, blame, panic, resentment, shame--limit thought to a narrow field that obscures options. Positive emotions help speed recovery from negative emotions. When people are able to self-generate a positive emotion or perspective, that enables them to bounce back. It's not just that you bounce back and then you feel good--feeling good drives the process.
Notice how Zig Zigular explains it:

 


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So train your brain to think positively.
For most of us, (the chronically optimistic aside) negative feedback registers more strongly than positive encouragement. That's why, when faced with challenges, it's important to take stock of what's going well. As corny as it may sound, positive affirmations help, By repeating them with conviction several times each morning, you are training your brain to believe them.Over time, you'll start to internalize them, Finding a way to focus on the positive takes time, You have to learn and practice. Listen to Jim Rohn's
view on the "LAW OF AVERAGES"
 


Ready to Make More Money? Understand the Multiplying Effect.

How much money do you want to make every year? If you haven’t seriously asked yourself that, you should. Why wouldn’t you? It’s a very easy question to answer. And until you’ve really thought about it, it’s impossible to determine how you’re going to get there.
When I was in my early twenties, my father sat me down and asked me that same question, point blank. The advice he gave me after fundamentally changed the way I thought about work and led me to my current career.
I told him I wanted to make $100,000 a year. At the time, I thought that was a lot of money. You’ll work for about another 30 years, he told me. So how much money would I make in my lifetime? I did the math: $3 million.
He asked, was I happy with that amount? If I wasn’t, what was I going to do about it?
My father was a smart man. Three million didn’t seem like a lot of money over 30 years, given taxes and living expenses. The math didn’t add up: Life is short, and it didn’t seem like enough for a lifetime of work. When I looked at the last paycheck I had received, I wasn’t happy.
My father told me the only way to create wealth was to find a business opportunity that had a multiplying effect and that didn’t require my presence. It took me some time to figure out what that meant. The latter part was easy enough. He explained, “A doctor can only help so many people in a day and in a year. A lawyer can only try so many cases.” To create great wealth, I needed to find something that didn’t require my hands or my presence. Fair enough.
The second was trickier: What did having a multiplying effect mean? He told me that I needed to piggyback on or create something that would be used over and over again -- that people never stopped needing. In other words, he explained to me the idea of collecting a royalty. That made sense to me. And it’s what spurred me to start licensing my ideas.
Today, there are many examples of businesses that share these qualities. App developers, for one. Franchises are another. And of course, there are countless examples of more traditional methods, like the stock market, bonds and real estate. 
For me, the concept of the multiplying effect was tremendously attractive. Some people derive pleasure and contentment from being masters of their craft, from working day in and day out with their hands. That’s not me. I wanted to make money and I wanted to be able to do new things, to constantly challenge myself in new ways.
How much money do you want to make? How are you going to make it? Finding my multiplying effect -- writing a book, offering a course and licensing my ideas -- has allowed me to live where I want, have people working for me elsewhere and be my own boss. It is incredibly freeing. It works for me.
I’m not saying it’s for everyone. But I want you to critically ask yourself how much you want to make. And do the math.  Listen to Jim Rohn below to appreciate why it is important to take advantage of this opportunity.